Creating A Legacy That Makes Dreams Come True


Arthur Schwartz

“I am a firm believer in turning challenges into possibilities, so I am happy knowing my gift will help more people overcome the challenges of blindness.”
—Arthur Schwartz

Five-year-old Arthur Schwartz had to fall and break his collar bone before a doctor discovered he had problems with his eyesight. The diagnosis was nearsightedness and retinal spots. Because glasses didn’t completely correct his condition, he struggled throughout his boyhood to compensate for poor vision.

Playing football and baseball with friends was also a problem since he couldn’t see the ball. So he created his own niche managing the neighborhood teams. Little did Arthur know that would pave the way to a successful career in sales and marketing and managing trade associations.

Another impressionable event in his life was as a student at the University of Connecticut where the famed blind jazz pianist, George Shearing, was giving a concert. Arthur had the chance to meet the musician and never forgot his outstanding performance and how at ease he seemed despite his blindness.

Building a Fulfilling Life

Today, Arthur can look back on a résumé filled with accomplishments. He produced conferences and trade shows and published industry newsletters. He also served as a consultant for the U.S. Agency for International Development, helping business owners in the developing world learn how to succeed in a free market economy. A travel lover, he has visited all seven continents and can claim more than 80 countries on his passport. “By understanding your physical limitations, as well as your areas of strength, you can build a fulfilling life,” says Arthur, reflecting on his personal journey.

Wanting to create a legacy that was meaningful and of benefit to others with vision loss, Arthur decided to support Braille Institute through a bequest in his will. “I am a firm believer in turning challenges into possibilities, so I am happy knowing my gift will help more people overcome the challenges of blindness.”

“Never stop dreaming,” he says, mindful that Braille Institute’s free services make students’ dreams come true.